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Map Spotlight: Korea Between the Wars by Nat Case

This Map Spotlight will be showcasing the runner-up of the 2023 Avenza Map Contest: Korea Between the Wars by Nat Case. This map was part of a series of five maps created by Nat to be published in the memoir Beyond the Border: A Korean’s Journey Between the North and South by Tae-hyok Kim and Nicole Kim Rogers, which follows Tae-hyok’s life in war-ridden mid-century Korea. This particular map is used to set the stage for the beginning of his story when North and South Korea were divided by the 38th parallel post-World War II. Hand-drawn map elements and handwriting-style labels are used to highlight relevant cities, provinces and other features of the Korean peninsula and surrounding regions.

Check out the other maps in the series on Nat’s website, and find Beyond the Border: A Korean’s Journey Between the North and South here.

Select the images below to see a detailed look at Nat’s map

Making the Map

Nat used both MAPublisher and Geographic Imager tools in the creation of this map. In MAPublisher, coastline and political boundaries as well as points were imported and then projected and rescaled. Transforming the projection of the data upon import allowed him to set up the map scale and projection of the document without needing to use the MAP View Editor after import. The coastline data was then exported as a TIFF to be used in the process of creating the textured shaded relief.

In Geographic Imager, a Prisma shaded relief was imported and transformed to the desired projection. It was then cropped and exported to a TIFF as well, to also be used in the process of creating the textured shaded relief.

Both TIFF files were then imported into the Illustrator map file. Nat used the grayscale of the Prisma relief as a mask in Illustrator to create the textured relief around the coastlines and land formations. The hand-drawn texture were created using textures from the Adobe Stock library.

Nat selected handwriting fonts when creating the labels using the Label tool to place them initially. He then adjusted the labels manually as desired.

See the winners announcement for the 2023 Avenza Map Contest here, and check out our other Map Spotlight blogs here!

Map Spotlight: Arctic Carbon Monitoring Network by Christina Shintani

In our first Map Spotlight of the year, we are showcasing the winner of the 2023 Avenza Map Contest: Arctic Carbon Monitoring Network by Christina Shintani, with additional contributions from Jessica Howard (text content) and Julianne Waite (illustration). This map shows eddy covariance flux tower locations in the Arctic that measure the continuous movement of carbon between soils, plants, and the atmosphere. This process is often intriguingly referred to as the Earth’s breath. These towers collect data that is crucial to establishing a comprehensive carbon monitoring network in the Arctic region, which will assist efforts in advancing plausible solutions to curbing permafrost thaw.

A warming Arctic contributes to intensifying wildfires and permafrost thaw, both of which in turn contribute to increased carbon emissions, which is a serious environmental concern. The supporting maps explore the various implications of what is at stake as the Arctic warms three to four times faster than the rest of the world: the Arctic ecosystems at risk, the extent of permafrost thaw, and the shifting of the Arctic from a carbon sink to a new source. Maps like Christina’s are helpful in allowing people to visualize and further understand the progressive impacts of climate change.

Check out more of Christina’s maps on her website, and learn more about the work of Permafrost Pathways here.

Select the images below to see a detailed look at Christina’s map

Making the Map

Christina used both MAPublisher and Geographic Imager tools in the creation of this map. Christina used the Import tool to import the data files she processed in another program, such as QGIS. Following import, she used the MAP Views panel to set up the map scale and projection of the document. Since this map required a polar map projection, the MAP View Editor was also used to reproject data layers from different coordinate systems.

Christina also employed MAP Themes in the creation of her map. Stylesheet Themes were used to symbolize the data on both the main map and supporting maps. These stylesheets could then be used to create legends for the respective maps.

In Geographic Imager, Christina opened her raster data using the Advanced Import, which contains several geoprocessing tools to adjust, crop or transform her imagery before importing it. This can be especially helpful when working with large datasets that may slow the program down if they are not cropped or downsized in some way. She also used the Transform feature to reproject images where necessary.

See the winner announcement for the 2023 Avenza Map Contest here, and check out our other Map Spotlight blogs here!

Quick Georeference Images with Geographic Imager

Sometimes we know enough about an image to georeference it in a faster manner than other images. In Geographic Imager, we call this type of georeferencing a Quick Georeference.

Quick Georeference is a method of georeferencing images that requires two conditions to be met:

  1. The image is not rotated; in other words, true north is oriented at the top of the page
  2. Two control points on the image are known, however these points cannot be aligned on either the X or Y axis

This article will show an example of quick georeferencing. The image used in this demonstration is called Americas_4.tif, and can be found in the Tutorial Data folder which is included with every installation of Geographic Imager.

After opening the image in Geographic Imager, you can confirm that it is aligned with true north. Then click the Georeference button on the Geographic Imager panel.

In the Georeference dialog box, you can click the Add Control Point button to do as such. Click anywhere on the image viewer to add a point. Point 1 will be added to the control point list. You can then adjust the pixel coordinates (PX and PY); these are the coordinates for the points on the image. Type 599 in the PX box and 0 in the PY box.

Next, you want to set the world coordinates that correspond to the pixel coordinates you just entered. You can double-click in the WX, WY or Coordinate System boxes to open the Edit Location dialog box. Here you want to select the WGS 84 coordinate system, and enter a Lat value of 35.917 and Long value of -50.064. After clicking OK, you will see that the world coordinates have been updated in the control point list.

You now want to add your second control point at the location with pixel coordinates of PX = 0 and PY = 456. Following the above steps again, give this point the world coordinates of Lat = 6.731 and Long = -88.417.

Now that you have added your two necessary control points to the image, you are ready to Quick Georeference your image. Next to the Image Coordinate System label, select the Specify… link. In the Choose Coordinate System dialog box, select the [No Coordinate System Specified] link. This opens the Specify Coordinate System dialog box, where you can select the Geodetic > World category, select the “WGS 84” coordinate system and click OK.

Back in the Georeference dialog box, select the Quick Georeference button (lightning bolt icon), and select By Two Reference Points (North/South aligned). You will notice that an additional control point is automatically added to the control point list and image view. Its world coordinates were calculated based on the existing two control point pairs. This occurs because a minimum of three control points are required to reference an image. It is also why the two control points you selected must not align.

To complete your Quick Georeference, simply click OK. Voilà! You will see the reference information appear in the Geographic Imager panel, and further details can be found in the Geographic Imager: General panel.

You can also check out our video tutorial for Quick Georeferencing on YouTube:

To view the step-by-step instructions that constituted the material in this blog post, check out the Quick Georeference tutorial in our Support Centre!

Avenza Releases Geographic Imager 6.7 for Adobe Photoshop

Toronto, ON, September 27, 2023 – Avenza Systems Inc., producers of the Avenza Maps® app for mobile devices and geospatial extensions for Adobe Creative Cloud®, including MAPublisher® for Adobe Illustrator®, is pleased to announce the release of Geographic Imager® version 6.7 for Adobe Photoshop®. This version offers full compatibility with Adobe Photoshop 2024 (version 25), and also includes some performance improvements and bug fixes.

Geographic Imager for Adobe Photoshop delivers an all-encompassing solution to import, edit, and export geospatial images such as aerial and satellite imagery. Work with digital elevation models, GeoTIFFs, and other popular GIS image formats, using Adobe Photoshop features such as transparencies, filters, cropping, and image adjustments, while maintaining georeferencing and support for hundreds of coordinate systems and projections.

Users require a valid Adobe Creative Cloud subscription and a compatible operating system to utilize the improvements and enhancements offered in Geographic Imager v6.7. For questions and information on how compatibility requirements may affect your organization, please contact our Support Centre.

Geographic Imager v6.7 is immediately available and is free of charge to all current Geographic Imager Maintenance Program members and starts at US$379 for non-maintenance upgrades. New fixed licenses start at US$809. Geographic Imager Basic Edition licenses start at US$119. Academic, floating, and volume license pricing is also available. Visit www.avenza.com/geographic-imager for more information.

More about Avenza Systems Inc.

Avenza Systems Inc. is an award-winning, privately held corporation that provides cartographers and GIS professionals with powerful software tools to make better maps. Avenza also offers the mobile Avenza Maps app to sell, purchase, distribute, and use maps on iOS and Android devices.
For further information contact: +1 416-487-5116 – info@avenza.comwww.avenza.com

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Avenza Releases Geographic Imager 6.6 for Adobe Photoshop

Toronto, ON, December 12, 2022 – Avenza Systems Inc., producers of the Avenza Maps® app for mobile devices and geospatial extensions for Adobe Creative Cloud®, including MAPublisher® for Adobe Illustrator®, is pleased to announce the release of Geographic Imager® version 6.6 for Adobe Photoshop®

This version comes with official support for all Apple Silicon processors as well as full compatibility with Adobe Photoshop 2023 (version 24) and macOS Ventura (version 13). Geographic Imager v6.6 also introduces a brand-new welcome screen design with increased discoverability for users and includes additional performance enhancements and bug fixes.

Geographic Imager for Adobe Photoshop delivers an all-encompassing solution to import, edit, and export geospatial images such as aerial and satellite imagery. Work with digital elevation models, GeoTIFFs, and other popular GIS image formats, using Adobe Photoshop features such as transparencies, filters, cropping, and image adjustments, while maintaining georeferencing and support for hundreds of coordinate systems and projections.

New features of Geographic Imager v6.6 for Adobe Photoshop include:

  • Apple Silicon processor support: Geographic Imager is now officially compatible with all Apple Silicon processors
  • Adobe Creative Cloud 2023 compatibility: Geographic Imager now supports Adobe Photoshop 2023 (version 24.0) on both Mac and Windows
  • macOS Ventura compatibility: Geographic Imager also officially supports the new macOS Ventura (version 13) update
  • New welcome screen design: Improved discoverability for users with more content to aid in getting started or inspired with Geographic Imager
  • Additional performance enhancements and bug fixes

Users require a valid Adobe Creative Cloud subscription and a compatible operating system to utilize the improvements and enhancements offered in Geographic Imager v6.6. For questions and information on how compatibility requirements may affect your organization, please contact our Support Centre.

Geographic Imager v6.6 is immediately available and is free of charge to all current Geographic Imager Maintenance Program members and starts at US$349 for non-maintenance upgrades. New fixed licenses start at US$749. Geographic Imager Basic Edition licenses start at US$99. Academic, floating, and volume license pricing is also available. Visit www.avenza.com/geographic-imager for more information.

More about Avenza Systems Inc.

Avenza Systems Inc. is an award-winning, privately held corporation that provides cartographers and GIS professionals with powerful software tools to make better maps. Avenza also offers the mobile Avenza Maps app to sell, purchase, distribute, and use maps on iOS and Android devices.
For further information contact: +1 416-487-5116 – info@avenza.comwww.avenza.com

What’s New in Geographic Imager 6.6?

We are very pleased to announce the release of Geographic Imager version 6.6, the latest version of our Geographic Imager® extension for Adobe Photoshop®

With Geographic Imager v6.6, we are announcing official support for all Apple Silicon processors, compatibility with Adobe Photoshop 2023 (version 24) and macOS Ventura (version 13), a brand new welcome screen design, and several performance enhancements and bug fixes.

Here’s what you can expect with the latest Geographic Imager v6.6 release:

Apple Silicon Processor Support

Our team has worked to ensure that Geographic Imager v6.6 runs smoothly with computers using any Apple Silicon chip, and as such, we can declare that Geographic Imager is now joining MAPublisher in officially supporting these processors.

Compatibility Updates for Adobe Photoshop and macOS

We want our users to enjoy a truly seamless integration with the Adobe Photoshop workspace. We are therefore happy to announce that Geographic Imager v6.6 is fully compatible with the new Adobe Photoshop 2023 (version 24) update on both Mac and Windows.

Geographic Imager v6.6 is also fully compatible with the recently released macOS Ventura (version 13).

New Welcome Screen Design

Geographic Imager v6.6 introduces a brand new welcome screen that appears upon opening the application. This window is equipped with visually appealing refreshed graphics while maintaining easy access to the License Management window. It also features several new sections that increase discoverability, such as getting started, help and tutorials, and other Avenza news or event information. There is also a Get Inspired section to provide inspiration for you, which features articles from our blog that highlights the excellent stories and tips from some of our most proficient users.

If you would like to learn more about the new Geographic Imager 6.6 features or have any questions, please check out our Support Centre.

Geographic Imager v6.6 is immediately available today, free of charge to all current Geographic Imager users with active maintenance subscriptions and as an upgrade for non-maintenance users. 

Creating Themed Maps Using Terrain Shader

Today we are shifting the spotlight to Geographic Imager, our plugin for Adobe Photoshop. This blog features the usage of the Terrain Shader tool, which was featured in our promotional video at the Adobe MAX conference last week!

Terrain Shader is great for adding dimension to your maps. It is commonly used to perform shaded relief, a method for representing topography on maps in a natural and intuitive way. The tool provides options to apply colourization schema and shaded relief to supported elevation data formats, such as DEM or SRTM files. Terrain Shader has several different settings that users can customize to create a shaded relief that best suits their needs.

In the spirit of Halloween, we’ve decided to show off the Terrain Shader tool by creating a fun shaded relief using a colourization schema that resembles candy corn! 

I’m starting with a DEM file covering a portion of Jasper National Park in Alberta. DEMs are imported by default using a black-white gradient, with black representing the lowest elevation and white representing the highest.

Raw DEM image

Next, you can open the Geographic Imager panel and select the Terrain Shader button.

Geographic Imager Toolbar showing Terrain Shader button

There are many different settings available in the Terrain Shader tool to customize your design. First, ensure the Colourization schema option is checked and set to “Apply colour map” which enables you to apply colour to your DEM. You can also choose the Method to stretch the colour map over a preset group of values or simply apply your colour ramp from the highest and lowest point on the DEM.

Next, you want to select any Gradient from the list and press the pencil icon to open the Colour Map editor window. From this window, you can set and adjust three different colour stops to represent the three candy corn colours you wish to apply to your map.

Geographic Imager Terrain Shader tool

When you are finished, be sure to click Save and save it as a new colour map, titled appropriately (in my case, it was “Candy Corn”). 

Finally, select Apply shaded relief and adjust the light source angle and intensity if desired. Shaded relief is what adds texture to your DEM to make it look like terrain.

Geographic Imager Terrain Shader tool

Click OK, and you have successfully created your very own candy corn mountains! This is just one fun way to make use of the terrain shader to add a personal touch to your map. See the final result below, as well as a few other examples of colourization schemas that can be used to add a more realistic feel to your terrain.

Candy corn style DEM created using Geographic Imager Terrain Shader tool

For more information about the Terrain Shader tool, check out our related Support Centre articles and tutorial!

Exploring Shaded Relief Techniques in Geographic Imager and Adobe Photoshop 3D

PLEASE NOTE: As of Photoshop 22.5, Adobe has discontinued support for the program’s 3D features. This may affect some or all elements of this blog. For more information, see Adobe’s FAQ page about this change and the Geographic Imager compatibility information page.

In the world of map-making, shaded relief refers to a visual technique that gives the illusion of three-dimensional terrain on an otherwise flat map. Cartographers use shaded relief to draw the viewer’s eye to prominent topographic features such as mountains, valleys and canyons. Using imaginary illumination sources and digital elevation data to cast directional light on a map, the cartographer can give the illusion of depth, casting shadows into valleys and lowlands, and highlighting ridgelines and peaks as if they are bathed in sunlight. 

Historically, this technique was achieved entirely by hand and was extremely labour intensive. Now, with modern graphical software and digital mapping technologies, relief shading can be accomplished right on the desktop. 

To demonstrate this, we are going to use the powerful spatial imagery tools and graphical design capabilities of the Geographic Imager plug-in for Adobe Photoshop to explore relief shading using a really interesting 19th-century historical map. Here is a sneak peek to show what the final product will look like.

Let’s start with our original map. We have taken an absolutely stunning United States Geological Survey Map of the world-renowned Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. Originally drafted by hand in the year 1899, the map features beautifully drawn contour lines and colour work showing the mountainous topography of the park and its surrounding area. The map, and thousands of others like it, are available in full-resolution on the USGS Historical Map Catalogue. Our goal will be to bring the map to life using three-dimensional (3D) relief shading techniques available with Geographic Imager and Adobe Photoshop.

First, we need to bring in some elevation data. Elevation data is critical for creating shaded relief, as it determines how light and shadows will behave in different parts of the map. We can obtain high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) for our region from the USGS EarthExplorer.

Those of your familiar with spatial imagery data and DEMs will know that our first challenge will be working with tiled (discontinuous) imagery data products. In its raw form, DEMs are often stored as identically sized tiles, with each tile representing a specific indexed region of the earth’s surface. It is an unfortunate reality that many times the spatial extent of each DEM tile rarely matches the exact extent of the area you are interested in mapping. As a result, map-makers and spatial imagery specialists need to implement tools to import, merge, and crop these tiles to a more useful format and size.

In our case, the elevation data for the area shown by the original 1899 topo-map is now represented by four separate DEM tiles, with roughly one tile for each quadrant of the map. To handle this problem, we can use the powerful Advanced Import tool within the Geographic Imager toolbar. The tool is a one-stop solution to easily import and mosaic our DEM datasets directly into Photoshop, all while retaining the spatial awareness we need to georeference or transform our data layers.

By combining each of the four raw DEM datasets, the tool will mosaic the tiles into a single merged, continuous, and geographically accurate elevation layer covering the entire extent of the map. Even more impressive is that Geographic Imager can use the spatial referencing information in the data to automatically align and overlay the original 1899 topo map onto the elevation layer, removing the need to perform manual georeferencing. (If the imagery data you are using does not have spatial referencing information already, don’t worry – our support team has crafted some excellent, easy to follow georeferencing in Geographic Imager tutorials).

With our DEM data imported into Photoshop, we can start to explore different techniques for creating shaded relief. We will start by using the Terrain Shader tool located on the Geographic Imager toolbar. Terrain shader is a one-click technique to create simple shaded relief instantly. It allows you to configure the angle and intensity of the simulated illumination source to control the prominence and direction of casted shadows. Additionally, you can apply customized colour gradients to easily produce stylized elevation maps or apply hypsometric tints. 

In many situations, the Terrain Shader tool is an all-in-one, quick and easy way to create shaded relief. The output of the tool makes it easy to distinguish topographic features and can be used to quickly produce a shaded-relief backdrop for your map.

One of the greatest benefits of using Geographic Imager is that we retain all the imagery manipulation and spatial referencing capabilities of a GIS while still having access to the massive inventory of powerful image editing tools provided by Photoshop. This allows us to take our shaded relief technique up a notch by incorporating the advanced 3D rendering and lighting tools of Photoshop 3D to truly bring our 1899 Grand Teton survey map to life.

To start, we first need to trim the DEM layer down to our specific area of interest. We used the GeoCrop tool to crop our mosaiced DEM layer down to the exact extent of our topo map (it is important that both layers are the exact same extent – you’ll see why later). Next, we can open up the Photoshop 3D toolbar, and convert our flat DEM into an extruded 3D “Depth Map”. 

To enhance the shaded relief effect, we need to apply a vertical exaggeration to the model. In 3D mode, we can drag the z-axis scaling slider to exaggerate the prominence of the topographical features in our map. By creating vertical exaggeration, we can create more pronounced shaded relief, as canyons and lowlands will capture shadows more effectively.

In 3D mode, we can use the mouse cursor to pan and rotate our “camera” to get different perspectives of our elevation model. This can be useful for creating orthographic or oblique perspective map styles.

Now that we have a configured 3D model of our map area, we can apply our simulated illumination source. Much like the Terrain Shader tool, we can control the illumination intensity and angle of approach. Since we are working in a 3D environment however, we now have three different axes that control where our light is coming from. Notice how the angle is important for affecting the length and intensity of shadows in our relief map. This includes the prominent mountain silhouettes that can be created when we set the light source to approach from a low angle on the horizon.

Next, we can configure the surface properties and apply a texture overlay to our 3D model. Experimenting with these settings changes how light interacts with the surface and can be refined to produce different relief shading effects. Using these surface properties, we can also drape the original 1899 Topo map onto our surface model (this is why it is important for both the DEM and the topo-map to share the exact same extent, otherwise the topo map will be distorted once it is draped over the surface).

Fine-tuning the map at this stage can take some time and experimentation. We can add some additional light sources with different casting angles and intensity to help create a multi-directional hillshade effect. We can also configure the light settings to produce softer, less pronounced shadows that look more realistic. After spending some time adjusting the lighting and surface settings, as well as configuring the camera view angle,  we can hit the “render” button and sit back while it creates a full-resolution rendering of our 3D model (this part can be very computationally intensive, and may require a high-performance machine to process efficiently).

Since we are still creating our map entirely within the Photoshop environment, we can immediately fine-tune the brightness, contrast, and colour of our map before exporting the final product. 

You can see some renders of the final map below. Thanks to the powerful spatial import and manipulation tools of Geographic Imager, and the ability to work entirely within the advanced image editing environment of Photoshop, we were able to create a dramatic 3D shaded relief effect that brings our 1899 USGS Grand Teton Survey map to life.

What’s New in Geographic Imager 6.3

Geographic Imager 6.3 - Avenza Systems

What’s New? Geographic Imager 6.3

We are happy to announce that Geographic Imager 6.3 is now available. This release brings continued improvements to compatibility with Adobe Photoshop 2021, and now offers full compatibility with the latest Mac OS 11 Big Sur release. We are also excited to introduce a brand new and easy way to access floating licenses directly from the cloud!

Here is what you can expect with the latest Geographic Imager 6.3 release:

macOS 11 Big Sur Compatibility

Users will be delighted to see that Geographic Imager 6.3 is now fully compatible with macOS 11 Big Sur. This means new and existing users can transition to the latest macOS without any interruption in their Geographic Imager capabilities.

Cloud Floating Licenses: A Better Way to Manage and Checkout Licenses

We have worked hard to deliver a newly improved floating license management system as part of Geographic Imager 6.3. This new license management system greatly improves on previous versions and allows users and administrators within an organization to efficiently and seamlessly access floating licenses directly from the cloud. The new licensing system is built on the RLM Cloud platform and means floating licenses can be implemented without the challenges of setting up, deploying, and managing a local server. Contact our Sales team to learn how you can set up your cloud floating licensing.

See the new cloud licensing options by accessing the license management panel within Geographic Imager 6.3

UXP Implementation for Chinese Versions of Geographic Imager 6.3

The Chinese version of Geographic Imager 6.3 now implements Adobe’s new powerful Unified Extensibility Platform. Which provides user interface improvements and flexibility to develop new tools in the future.

Geographic Imager Available Now

All active maintenance subscribers can upgrade to Geographic Imager 6.3 today for free. Users without an active maintenance subscription or on a previous Geographic Imager version can still upgrade.

 

Avenza Releases Geographic Imager 6.3 for Adobe Photoshop

 

Toronto, ON, February 22, 2021 – Avenza Systems Inc., producers of the Avenza Maps® app for mobile devices and geospatial plugins for Adobe Creative Cloud®, including MAPublisher® for Adobe Illustrator®, is pleased to announce the release of Geographic Imager® 6.3. This latest version provides full compatibility with macOS 11 Big Sur, and introduces a new cloud licensing system to efficiently access and manage floating licenses across an organization without the need to set-up, deploy and manage a local server. 

“Geographic Imager has built a reputation for providing a powerful suite of tools that seamlessly integrate into spatial imagery workflows built around Adobe Photoshop,” said Ted Florence, President of Avenza Systems. “By offering improved cloud licensing features and full compatibility with the latest macOS 11 release, Geographic imager continues to provide the productive, reliable user experience our customers have come to trust and rely upon”

Powering the Geospatial Imagery Editing Process

Geographic Imager for Adobe Photoshop® delivers an all-encompassing solution to import, edit, and export geospatial images such as aerial and satellite imagery. Work with digital elevation models, GeoTIFFs, and other popular GIS image formats while using Adobe Photoshop® features such as transparencies, filters, cropping, and image adjustments; all while maintaining georeferencing and support for hundreds of coordinate systems and projections.

New features of the Geographic Imager 6.3 plugin for Adobe Photoshop® include:

  • macOS 11 compatibility: Fully compatible with macOS 11 Big Sur
  • Cloud-based floating licenses: Access floating licenses easily with RLM Cloud
  • Chinese UXP update: Geographic imager 6.3 (Chinese Version) now uses Adobe’s new Unified Extensibility Platform (UXP)

 

Geographic Imager 6.3 is immediately available and free of charge to all current Geographic Imager Maintenance Program members and starts at US$349 for non-maintenance upgrades. New fixed licenses start at US$749. Geographic Imager Basic Edition licenses start at US$99. Academic, floating, and volume license pricing is also available. For more information, visit www.avenza.com/geographic-imager.

More about Avenza Systems Inc.

Avenza Systems Inc. is an award-winning, privately held corporation that provides cartographers and GIS professionals with powerful software tools to make better maps. In addition to desktop mapping software, Avenza offers the mobile Avenza Maps app to sell, purchase, distribute, and use maps on iOS and Android devices. For more information, visit www.avenza.com.

For further information contact:  416-487-5116 – info@avenza.comwww.avenza.com